Ludham & Stalham Green Surgeries

It is not possible to provide all services under the NHS, therefore in some cases you may have to pay a fee. 
 
Isn't the NHS supposed to be free?
The National Health Service provides most health care to most people free of charge, but there are exceptions: prescription charges have existed since 1951, and there are a number of other services for which fees are charged. Sometimes the charge is made to cover some of the cost of treatment, for example, dental fees; in other cases, it is because the service is not covered by the NHS, for example, medical reports for insurance companies.
 
Surely the doctor is being paid anyway?
It is important to understand that GPs are not employed by the NHS, they are self-employed, and they have to cover their costs - staff, buildings, heating, lighting, etc - in the same way as any small business. The NHS covers these costs for NHS work, but for non-NHS work the fee has to cover the doctor's costs.
 
What is covered by the NHS and what is not?
The Government's contract with GPs covers medical services to NHS patients. In recent years, more and more organisations have been involving doctors in a whole range of non-medical work. Sometimes the only reason that GPs are asked is because they are in a position of trust in the community, or because an insurance company or employer wants to be sure that information provided is true and accurate.
 
Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge their NHS patients are:
¨ accident/sickness insurance certificates
¨ certain travel vaccinations
¨ private medical insurance reports
 
Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge other institutions are:
¨ medical reports for an insurance company
¨ some reports for the DSS/Benefits Agency
¨ examinations of local authority employees
 
Is it true that the BMA sets fees for non-NHS work?
The BMA suggests fees for non-NHS work which is not covered under a GP’s NHS contract, to help GPs set their own professional fees. However, these fees are guidelines only, not recommendations, and a doctor is not obliged to charge the rates suggested.
 
Why does it sometimes take my GP a long time to complete my form?
Time spent completing forms and preparing reports takes the GP away from the medical care of his or her patients. Most GPs have a very heavy workload - the majority work up to 70 hours a week - and paperwork takes up an increasing amount of their time, so many GPs find they have to take some paperwork home at night and weekends.
 
I only need the doctor's signature - what is the problem?
When a doctor signs a certificate or completes a report, it is a condition of remaining on the Medical Register that they only sign what they know to be true. In order to complete even the simplest of forms, therefore, the doctor might have to check the patient's entire medical record. Carelessness or an inaccurate report can have serious consequences for the doctor with the General Medical Council or even the Police.
 
How much will it cost?
The fee charged will depend on the service required. Some simple requests can be as little as £10.00, but more complex requests will incur a higher fee. When you request a private medical service, you will be quoted an exact figure, so you are able to make an informed decision on whether to proceed.
 
Who will deal with my request?
You can speak to any member of the practice team to make a request for a private medical service. They will liaise with the necessary clinicians on your behalf and arrange appointments if required.
 
How can I pay?
You can pay by cash, cheque or debit card. You will be required to pay on the day of your examination or upon collection of your form/letter.
 
 
 

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